Validating identity problem on wireless


01-Jul-2020 17:07

The current standard is WPA2; some hardware cannot support WPA2 without firmware upgrade or replacement.

WPA2 uses an encryption device that encrypts the network with a 256-bit key; the longer key length improves security over WEP.

Modern operating systems such as Linux, mac OS, or Microsoft Windows make it fairly easy to set up a PC as a wireless LAN "base station" using Internet Connection Sharing, thus allowing all the PCs in the home to access the Internet through the "base" PC.

However, lack of knowledge among users about the security issues inherent in setting up such systems often may allow others nearby access to the connection.

Such "piggybacking" is usually achieved without the wireless network operator's knowledge; it may even be without the knowledge of the intruding user if their computer automatically selects a nearby unsecured wireless network to use as an access point. If an employee (trusted entity) brings in a wireless router and plugs it into an unsecured switchport, the entire network can be exposed to anyone within range of the signals.

Hackers had not yet had time to latch on to the new technology, and wireless networks were not commonly found in the work place.Hacking has also become much easier and more accessible with easy-to-use Windows- or Linux-based tools being made available on the web at no charge.